House #1 – The Old Homestead…

House #1 – The Old Homestead…

For our Idea House owners, remaining in their beloved family home was an option, but after factoring in all things, it was not the best one. Theirs is a story of multi-generational Aging in Place – it is, in essence, a story of three houses...

This home was among the first houses built in the Green Hills Subdivision. The neighborhood was carved out of farmland and remained flanked by such for years, while Green Hills, as we know it, evolved. One of the Idea House owners grew up in this house and the other lived on Richard Jones Road, about where Levy’s is. Their families were close and they are lifelong friends with deep roots in this area.

The owner’s parents designed, built and lived in this house for 73 years. When her father passed away, her mother was 85, and made the decision that she was going to remain at home for as long as possible (i.e, forever). Like many older folks, she had a fiercely independent spirit and became increasingly concerned about having enough money to take care of herself for the long haul – she didn’t “want to be a burden” on her family. So she lived frugally and opted not to spend money on the house. In the end, her wish was honored, but the family believes that the condition of the home negatively impacted her quality of life, and for sure, reduced the value of her primary asset. Most of us are probably familiar with this situation – it is not uncommon, nor is it necessarily tied to financial means.

Aging in Place Tip: For most folks, homes are among our primary assets. For those considering Aging in Place, financial planning should include the on-going costs of maintaining and operating the home, as well as factoring in the potential need for modifications.